History

E-470 Has a Long History

Starting as a joint effort among local government to build and operate an eastern metro Denver beltway, the E-470 Public Highway Authority has grown to become an industry leader in tolling transportation and innovation. Now handling more than 118 million toll transactions per year, E-470 has established itself as a regional mobility solution for metro Denver.

1980

1981

Centennial Airport Influence Area Transportation Study is launched, resulting in the recommended extension of C-470 east and north to Interstate 70.

February 26, 1985

E-470 Authority is formed through Memorandum of Understanding between Adams, Arapahoe and Douglas counties.

August 28, 1986

Proceeds of $722 million in bonds are deposited in pledged account. August 27, 1987 Governor Romer signs the Public Highway Authority (PHA) Act.

August 27, 1987

Governor Romer signs the Public Highway Authority (PHA) Act.

January 13, 1988

Adams, Arapahoe and Douglas counties enter into a contract establishing the E-470 Public Highway Authority (Authority) as successor to the original E-470 Authority.

December 14, 1988

Roy Romer, fourth from left, Betty Anne Dittemore, the only woman, and other leaders did shovel duty at the December 14, 1988 groundbreaking for E-470’s Segment I.

1990

June 1, 1991

Segment I from I-25 South/C-470 to Parker Road opens at 3:30 p.m. One month later, tolls begin on Segment I.

May 1, 1992

E-470 has its millionth toll-paying customer.

January 1, 1996

Institutional Investor Magazine names E-470’s investment grade financing as a “Deal of the Year” for 1995.

March 16, 1996

Ten-millionth toll-paying customer passes through E-470 toll plazas.

March 14, 1998

Ground is broken on the Authority’s Administrative Headquarters Facility and the building officially opens on February 1, 1999.

2000

June 1, 2001

E-470 launches the Transportation Safety Foundation.

January 3, 2003

E-470 opens final segment or the road from U.S. 85 to the I-25 North interchange in Thornton, completing the 47-mile semi-circular beltway.

June 4, 2007

Cable median barrier installed on 10.25 miles, between South Parker Road and E. Jewell Avenue to improve safety and prevent cross over accidents by absorbing the crash’s kinetic energy and keeping the vehicle in place rather than bouncing it back into traffic. Cable barrier is currently installed on all 47 miles of E-470.

July 4, 2009

E-470 becomes the first all-electronic toll facility in the United States with non-stop cashless tolling.

2010

2011

Transition from hard-case transponders to sticker tags begins.

March 2012

In 2012, E-470 completed the installation of 22 solar arrays in a 17 mile stretch between Gartrell Road and 64th Avenue. The energy from the solar panels powers streetlights, signage, equipment, toll plazas and maintenance facilities along E-470. All panels are built to allow for any solar energy left unused by E-470 to be banked and drawn on in the future.

September 2013

E-470 wins the IBTTA Presidential award for its installation of solar power arrays along the toll road.

February 19, 2016

E-470 begins work on project to widen the highway to three lanes in each direction from Parker Road to Quincy Ave. Work was completed in 2017.

August 2017

E-470 installs two DC fast electric vehicle chargers at its headquarters building. Use of the EV chargers is free to drivers.

June 17, 2019

Next phase of road widening project begins, adding a third lane in each direction from Quincy Ave. to I-70.

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